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The Obsidian Age
Photos & Art by James Velasquez

Welcome to an exploration of artistic ideas and concepts that I’m currently working on including photos, videos, drawings and a variety of mediums.

Most of what I post is my own work, but occasionally, I may also post things which were not originally mine, always citing the original sources whenever possible.

Besides working in theatre and music, I’m also a freelance artist, photographer and designer based in New Orleans.
One Hot Mama on Flickr.

One Hot Mama on Flickr.

Signs of America on Flickr.

Signs of America on Flickr.

Brands and Tradition on Flickr.
Keeping Stars Apart on Flickr.

dcu:

I step away from the internet for one day, and Before Watchmen happens. While I’m impressed by some of the talent on board, one creator seems out of place here (cough*JMS*cough). DC’s The Source has a slew of information on this new series, which has Alan Moore pissed off beyond belief. Frankly, I’m surprised DC waited this long to do this.

Oh, and before you ask: Yes, I will be reading some of these….

theatlanticvideo:

A Film Noir Photo Essay on the Secretive World of Swiss Banks

The Vaults is a finely crafted multimedia experience of Mark Heneley’s photographs of the Swiss banking sector in Zurich. Anna Stevens of Panos Pictures taps film noir and James Bond movies for inspiration in her edit, which adds sound and text to create a story.

(via theatlantic)

Breakthrough on Flickr.

Breakthrough on Flickr.

Reconstructed Dream on Flickr.
Contemplation in Geometry on Flickr.
poptech:

Sebastian Thrun Aims to Revolutionize University Education With Udacity | Singularity Hub

This past August fellow Singularity Hub writer Aaron Saenz wrote about Udacity, the online university created by Stanford artificial intelligence professor and Google autonomous vehicle leader, Sebastian Thrun. At the time Thrun was gearing up to teach his  Introduction to Artificial Intelligence course to a class of 200 at  Stanford. But why teach 200 when you can teach 1,000…or 160,000? With  Udacity, Thrun and fellow AI giant Peter Norvig created an online version of the course, and anyone that wanted to  enroll could – for free. The homework assignments and exams would be the  same as the ones given to the Stanford students, and they would be  graded in the same way so online enrollees could see how they stacked up  to some of the brightest students in the world. It was to be a grand  experiment in education.
Now, the semester’s over. The exams have been taken, the homework’s  been turned in, computers logged off and pencils set down. How’d it all  turn out? Thrun spoke recently at the Digital Life Design conference about he and Norvig’s experience. As you’ll see, his students weren’t the only ones with much to learn.
Online, the course went viral. Over 100,000 people enrolled in the  initial weeks. By the time the lessons began Thrun and Norvig were  instructors for a class size of 160,000. With students all over the  world, they enlisted the help of some 2,000 volunteer translators to  translate the classes into 44 different languages. Discussion groups  were set up on social networks like Facebook so students could help each  other, forming what Thrun called an “entire counterculture.”

(via smarterplanet) 

poptech:

Sebastian Thrun Aims to Revolutionize University Education With Udacity | Singularity Hub

This past August fellow Singularity Hub writer Aaron Saenz wrote about Udacity, the online university created by Stanford artificial intelligence professor and Google autonomous vehicle leader, Sebastian Thrun. At the time Thrun was gearing up to teach his Introduction to Artificial Intelligence course to a class of 200 at Stanford. But why teach 200 when you can teach 1,000…or 160,000? With Udacity, Thrun and fellow AI giant Peter Norvig created an online version of the course, and anyone that wanted to enroll could – for free. The homework assignments and exams would be the same as the ones given to the Stanford students, and they would be graded in the same way so online enrollees could see how they stacked up to some of the brightest students in the world. It was to be a grand experiment in education.

Now, the semester’s over. The exams have been taken, the homework’s been turned in, computers logged off and pencils set down. How’d it all turn out? Thrun spoke recently at the Digital Life Design conference about he and Norvig’s experience. As you’ll see, his students weren’t the only ones with much to learn.

Online, the course went viral. Over 100,000 people enrolled in the initial weeks. By the time the lessons began Thrun and Norvig were instructors for a class size of 160,000. With students all over the world, they enlisted the help of some 2,000 volunteer translators to translate the classes into 44 different languages. Discussion groups were set up on social networks like Facebook so students could help each other, forming what Thrun called an “entire counterculture.”

(via smarterplanet